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Castle exhibitions

Titania's Palace

Titania's Palace was executed by the English painter and officer Sir Nevile Wilkinson and a staff of outstanding craftsmen. It was Sir Nevile's small daughter Gwendolen who asked her father to make her a house for the little fairies she had seen in the garden. She was convinced that they lived in holes in the ground and deserved to have a fine house in which to live instead. It took Sir Nevile 15 years to complete the task together with a body of skilled irish craftsmen.
 
The Palace contains no fewer than 3,000 components, many of them small art treasures collected from around the world.
 

Hans Christian Andersen - The Paper Doll Augusta Snorifass

In the 1860s, Hans Christian Andersen designed a little paper doll and called her Augusta Snorifass. Egeskov presents the paper doll and her impressive wardrobe in a special exhibition in Jomfru Rigborg Stuen (Maid Rigborg Room) until 19 October 2014.
 
The world-renowned Danish fairy tale writer Hans Christian Andersen was born in the town of Odense in 1805. One of his favourite pastimes was to create his magical paper cuttings while telling the spellbound children stories about the fantasy figures his scissors brought to life.
 

The Toy Exhibition

Up in the loft is a fine collection of historic toys.
 

Housekeeping at Egeskov - then and now

The “Housekeeping at Egeskov – then and now” exhibition reveals among other things just how physically demanding the job of cleaning the castle was in the old days. The floor mop used by the staff weighs 15 kg!
 
See the housekeeping equipment used at Egeskov, from kitchen utensils to cleaning equipment.
 

The Wooden Man

Beneath the spire of the tower lies Egeskov’s wooden man. It is said that if he is moved from his position on the cushion, Egeskov will sink into the moat on Christmas Eve.
 
Generations past at Egeskov reputedly never used to spend Christmas at the castle, fearing that this prediction would come true. However, although a Danish Christmas tradition usually reserved for elves, the current count’s family takes a bowl of rice pudding up to the wooden man, while they themselves celebrate Christmas safely ensconced in the festively decorated rooms below.